The Braid Family

By Andrea Cade, 2020.

Introduction

This is the story of Rosanna and David Braid and their family. Rosanna migrated to New Zealand from England, arriving in 1858 at the age of 6 years with her widowed mother and younger half-sister. David migrated from Scotland, arrived in New Zealand in 1866 at the age of 21. They married in 1874 and made their first home together at The Halfway (Glenside) on land David had purchased in 1867.

braid family

Rosanna and David Braid with their children. From left: Fanny, George (seated) Isabella, Mrs Rosanna Braid (seated) Henry on ground, Charles (standing) David Braid (seated), Emma, Frederick and Caroline (known as Carrie). Henry is the youngest in the family. George and Caroline were born at the cottage in Glenside (the Halfway).
Photo held: Andrea Cade collection

 Cunliffe's Bakehouse in Johnsonville, formerly Braid's

Cunliffe's bakehouse in Johnsonville, previously Braid's bakehouse
Photo held: Andrea Cade collection

Braid Cottage 2020

Rosanna and David Braid's cottage in 2020, built c1867

David Braid, undated

David Braid, undated. Described on the reverse as 'comp, fair, not much colour, hair dark brown, eyes med.blue, beard and moustache dark brown, slight tinge of dark auburn'
Photo held: Andrea Cade collection

Rosanna sails to New Zealand

Rosanna Boon (aka Pomeroy) was born at Coles Cross, Somerset, England, on 3 May 1852. She came to New Zealand with her widowed mother Caroline Pomeroy and younger half-sister Fanny on the Oliver Lang arriving in Wellington in September 1858. They came to join Caroline’s father William and two brothers who had come out to New Zealand in 1855. William Boon had a section at the Hutt.

The following year Caroline married George Champion. They went to Kapiti Island and lived there for several years. Two children were born there. The family then moved to Pauatahanui where George Champion farmed. George and Caroline had another five children. George and Caroline remained at Pauatahanui for the rest of their lives.

David Braid sails to New Zealand

David Braid was born on 7 May 1844 at Tayport (Ferry-Port on Craig) Scotland. He was the eldest of six children. Apparently as a young man David became a bit of an embarrassment to his family so at the age of 21, he was sent to New Zealand as a remittance man. By this time both his parents were dead as well as two younger siblings. 

David left for New Zealand on the Epsom on 3 November 1865 with eight other passengers, including William Cook. The ship arrived in Wellington on 3 March 1866. 

Braids 106 acre dairy farm on the Porirua Road

A Crown Grant of 106 acres was originally made to Charles Wittenoon. He died leaving the property under his will to William Calvert of London and William Gilling of Liverpool, trustees. Gilling sold the land to Wm Rowlands, storekeeper for £198 15s 0d. Two years later in Sept 1867 the section was conveyed to Edwin Woodhouse, clerk, Wn; William Cook, draper, Wn; and David Braid as joint owners. Woodhouse sold his share to Cook in November 1870. Cook sold his portion to David Braid on 3 March 1880.

David Braid put his property on the market a year later in 1881. It was described in the Evening Post newspaper as a "splendid farm" fronting the public road and convenient to the junction of the old and new Porirua Roads. "A great portion of the property is cleared and laid down in grass, and the whole is admirably adapted for dairy farming."

The property had a newly erected dwelling-house, offices, and out-buildings and was known as "formerly in the occupation of Mr. David Braid". The stock was for sale as well and included "11 milch cows, 2 two-year old heifers, 5 one-year old heifers, 4 large calves, 1 bull, 2 draught horses, 2 pigs, 50 fowls, 1 large firewood dray, 2 tip drays, 1 firewood sledge, 2 sets cart harness, 1 set trace harness, 1 chaffcutter, 1 set sledge chains, 1 logging chain, 1 wheelbarrow, dairy utensils, and sundry articles appertaining to a dairy farm."

He may not have sold the farm at the time, as he still owned it in 1885, when he sued the Wellington and Manawatu Railway Company for compensation for taking four acres for railway. He later sold 99 acres in 1890 and the remaining two acres sold for tender in 1897.

Early years and marriage

In the first few years David Braid was a carter carrying loads of firewood to Wellington. Presumably the firewood came from his section as he cleared it. Around this time David built a cottage on the section at Glenside (Halfway), which is still there today. Water was supplied by a nearby spring. Rosanna Pomeroy married David Braid in January 1874 at Reverand  Mair’s home in Wellington. Their first two children were born at the cottage.

The Johnsonville bakehouse and shop

By 1876 David Braid had a bakehouse and shop built on the Main Road, Johnsonville, opposite Taylor’s Hotel and the family moved there. David employed people to do the actual baking but delivered the bread in his horse and cart and served in the shop. He retained the farm at Glenside (Halfway). Eight children were born at the bakehouse, with two dying as infants.

The Braid children

Rosanna and David Braid had 10 children:

Caroline (1874-1961)
George (1875–1958)
Emma (1876-1976)
Isabella (1878-1937)
Rosanna (1879-1880)
Charles (1880-1925)
Maude (1882-1882)
Fanny (1883-1985)
Frederick (1885-1941)
Henry (1887-1924)

Only one of the Braid sons married and he did not have any children of his own, so the Braid name died out.

Active in local politics and suffrage

David Braid took a keen interest in local body affairs. He stood unsuccessfully for the Johnsonville Licensing District and the Johnsonville Town Board but was on the Johnsonville School Committee for a number of years and was appointed assessor for No. 1 Ward for the Wellington Highway District in 1878. He and Rosanna supported women’s votes. Rosanna signed the suffragette petition and David convened a meeting of lady voters in October 1893.

Wellington and Manawatu Railway Company troubles

The Wellington and Manawatu Railway Company purchased land between 1884-1887 for the construction of a railway from Wellington to Foxton. Some of the land was purchased with agreement but many claims had to be settled by the Compensation Court. The Railway Company took land from David Braid's bakery and from his farm for the railway line.

David sued the Company for £600 for severance of land in Johnsonville on which his house stood and £300 for 4 3/4 acres of his land taken by the company from his Section 25 at Glenside (Halfway).  In 1885 the Compensation Court awarded £112 10s for the losses in Johnsonville and an award of £150, with £15 costs for the loss of part of his farm. 

On 26 May1890, David Braid sold 99 acres of Section 25 to George Graham Wilson, Clerk, of Wellington, retaining 2 acres, presumably Porirua Road frontage.

Tough times

David was not a good businessman and was declared bankrupt twice. During his second bankruptcy, in 1897, he blamed the first bankruptcy in 1896, for shaking his business and affecting his credit. However, the findings were that he was selling his bread for less than it was costing him, and some of his creditors said he was spending his money too freely. His bakery and store went out for tender, and the tenderer agreed to make arrangements with the mortgagee for the premises. G. R. McDonald successfully tendered for the 2 acres of Section 25, which had a small shed on it.

In August the case was brought back to the Court. David Braids assignee stated that his client had "recently suffered a severe affliction, by which he was almost blind, and was now dependent upon his children for support". 

All the creditors were willing to agree to his discharge. His assignee said Mr Braid had "carried on a reputable business for many years. His family were highly respectable, but, unfortunately, he had given way to drink." 

The application for discharge was refused.

In 1900 Rosanna Braid left her husband and moved to Wellington with her children. I don’t know where David ended up living.

Death 1906

David Braid died in 1906. Probate records, dated 1906-1907 and held in National Archives, New Zealand, inform that he was a resident of Johnsonville and died in Wellington Hospital on about 16th of June 1906.

He did not leave a will, however Rosanna, his wife, agreed to provide an inventory of his estate, which was estimated to be valued at £40. The Court noted she could not write, and the mark of a cross was recorded as her signature. Mr Toogood, of Solicitors, Field, Luckie and Toogood represented her. 

The dispersement of the estate was witnessed by David and Rosanna's sons-in-law, David Parnell, Wellington City Council Inspector (who married Emma) and Louis Macfarlane, baker and resident of Tory Street (who married Carrie).

The Parnell  address was recorded as 2 Ellice Street, and it was from here, that David Braid was taken to his burial site at Karori Cemetery. Rosanna Braid died in 1931 and was also buried at Karori Cemetery. 

Legacy

by Claire Bibby

David Braid has generally been recorded and remembered in history as a baker however it his farm cottage and buildings that he is admired for today. His cottage is listed as a heritage building on the Wellington City Council District Plan and continues to be lived in. The adjacent farm buildings, cow bails, pens and stables, were crushed beneath a macrocarpa which fell in the storm of 1947.

The 1897 Cyclopedia of New Zealand (the year David Braid was declared bankrupt for the second time) describes Johnsonville at the time as a "farming centre", its "staple products are wool, and mutton for freezing and the meat markets". 

Johnsonville was "a town district in the Porirua riding of the Hutt County, and at the census of April, 1896, had a population of 493 - 249 of which were males and 244 females". 

It cites Johnsonville as having two Hotels, two blacksmiths, two storekeepers and five business. After including several paragraphs about William Cook (baker and storekeeper) and Mr J Cunliffe, there is the following sentence:

Braid, David, Baker and Grocer, Main Street, Johnsonville (p.1066).

Fred Marshall, a Johnsonville old-timer, described the Glenside valley as he remembered it in 1873. His reminisces were published in The Onslow Historian of 1978 under the heading "Now for The Halfway (Glenside)" He wrote:

A little further on lived Davy Braid up on the hill, who carted firewood to Wellington and later built a bakehouse right opposite Taylor’s Hotel (p.13).

David Braid is remembered in several local histories including Johnsonville Yesterday, An Album From The Past by Joseph & Betty Kenneally, 1981 (p. 23); The Onslow Historian, V 4 No. 3 1974 (p.15); The Onslow Historian, Old Johnsonville Stories No 1 1978 (p.13) and The Onslow Historian, Glenside V 32 Nos 1-4 2002 (p. 25). A description of his rural Section 25 and family is in Tawa Flat and The Old Porirua Road 1840 -1982 by Arthur H Carman (pp. 76-77).

Johnsonville School Centennial

Fanny Fry (need Braid) and Emma Parnell (nee Braid) attended the 1967 centenary celebrations of Johnsonville School. They were named in the centennial publication as two of 18 pupils listed as present at the celebrations, who had attended the school before 1900. Emma was first in the list, commencing school in 1883, and Fanny was third, commencing school in 1888. As the oldest pupil present, Emma had the honour of cutting the iced centennial cake.

Source: Meyer, R.J. (1967, p42, 45). Johnsonville Souveneer of the School Centenary, Wright & Carman Ltd, Wellington New Zealand.

St. John Anglican Church 125 year celebrations

Fanny Fry (nee Braid)  cut the cake for the St John Church 125th celebrations in 1972, as the oldest member of the congregation.

Newspaper articles

1877 Appointed as Assessor for year 1878

Highways Office, Hutt, 12th December, 1877.
The following persons have been appointed Assessors for the Wellington Highway District for the year 1878, in accordance with Rating Act, 1876 :—
No. 1 Ward— Mr. David Braid
No 2 Ward— Mr. Thomas Smith
Nos. 3, 5, and 6 Ward— Joseph Brown
No. 4 Ward— Duncan Sinclair
By order. Henry Ashton, Clerk W.D.H Board.

Evening Post, Volume XVI, Issue 3, 12 December 1877 Page 3

1880 Braid dairy farm for sale

TUESDAY, 15th FEBRUARY, 1881
Sale of Valuable Dairy Farm near Johnsonville. Messrs, J. H. Bethune & Co. have been instructed by the Mortgagee to sell by public auction at their sale rooms, corner of Featherston and Brandon-streets, on Tuesday, 15th February, at 2 o'clock— The under-mentioned property and dairy farm, stock, and utensils—

Lot I. All that piece or parcel of land, containing one hundred acres, or thereabouts, situated in and being part of the section numbered 25 on the plan of the Porirua District, bounded towards the north, 5480 links, by section numbered 27 ; on the south by section numbered 23, 5660 links ; on the east, 1670 links, by sections numbered 6 and 8, Horokiwi District; and on the west by the new Porirua-road, together with the newly - erected dwelling-house, offices, and out-buildings thereon, and known as formerly in the occupation of Mr. David Braid.

Lot II. 11 milch cows, 2 two-year old heifers, 5 one-year old heifers, 4 large calves, 1 bull, 2 draught horses, 2 pigs, 50 fowls, 1 large firewood dray, 2 tip drays, 1 firewood sledge, 2 sets cart harness, 1 set trace harness, 1 chaffcutter, 1 set sledge chains, 1 logging chain, 1 wheelbarrow, dairy utensils, and sundry articles appertaining to a dairy farm, and now in upon and about the land and premises described in Lot 1.

This splendid farm is situated near Johnsonville, fronting the public road and convenient to the junction of the old and new Porirua Roads. A great portion of the property is cleared and laid down in grass, and the whole is admirably adapted for dairy farming.
Terms Liberal. For further particulars apply to Messrs. BUCKLEY, STAFFORD, & FITZHERBERT, Solicitors to the Mortgagee; Or to the Auctioneers.

New Zealand Times, Volume XXXVI, Issue 6184, 2 February 1881 Page 4

1885 Braid sues Railway Company for £600

There will be two sittings of the Compensation Court during the next fortnight. On the 24th will be heard the case of Walker v. the Wellington and Manawatu Railway Company, in which the plaintiff seeks to recover £4000 damages for land taken for railway purposes at Parramatta. Two more cases will be taken on the 28th. The plaintiff in these is Mr. David Braid, baker, of Johnsonville, who is suing the Wellington and Manawatu Railway Company for £600, the amount of damage he alleges he has sustained through the action of the defendants in taking the line through his property. These two cases will be tried by a Supreme Court Judge and Messrs. T. K. Macdonald and A. Hasell as assessors.

Evening Post, Volume XXX, Issue 37, 12 August 1885 Page 2

 

Magistrate's Court. This Day. (Before Mr. H. S. Wardell, R.M.).
The Compensation Court sat this morning to decide two claims for compensation made by Mr. David Braid against the Wellington and Manawatu Railway Company. His Honour Mr. Justice Richmond and Messrs. J. R. George and Hasell presided. Mr. Devine appeared for the claimant and Mr. Travers for the company. The first case was a claim for £600 for severance of land in Johnsonville on which the claimant's house stands. After hearing evidence the Court awarded £112 10s as the amount of loss to the claimant. The second case was for £300 for land taken by the company out of a section about a mile from Johnsonville, The case was still under consideration when we went to press.

Evening Post, Volume XXX, Issue 80, 1 October 1885 Page 3

 

In the case David Braid v. Wellington Manawatu Railway Company, a claim for £300 compensation for land taken from the claimant by the railway company, the Compensation Court allowed the claimant £150 and £15 costs.

Evening Post, Volume XXX, Issue 81, 1 October 1885 Page 3

 

A sitting of the Compensation Court was held yesterday morning. His Honor Judge Richmond presided, and Messrs J. K. George and Hasell acted as assessors. The cases heard were two, in which Mr David Braid claimed from the Wellington-Manawatu Railway Company £600 for severance of land on which business premises stand at Johnsonville ; and £300 on account of section No. 25, at Porirua. In the first case, when some evidence had been taken, £112 10s was accepted as a compromise; and in the second, an award of £150, with £l5 costs, was made.

New Zealand Times, Volume XLV, Issue 7594, 2 October 1885 Page 2 

1886 Elections Johnsonville Licencing District Committee

LICENSING ELECTIONS. Johnsonville
The nomination of candidates for election on the Johnsonville Licensing Committee took place on Friday, when the following names were received by the Returning Officer, Mr Henry White:—Anders Anderson, Thomas Bennett, Robert Bould, David Braid, James Bryant, Wm. Cook, Frederick Marshall, Thomas H. Wilmshurst. The poll is to be taken at Johnsonville Town Board office on the 24th instant.

New Zealand Times, Volume XLVI, Issue 7713, 22 February 1886 Page 2

 

JOHNSONVILLE.
The following is the result of the polling in the election of a committee for the Johnsonville Licencing District, which took place yesterday: — Thomas Bennett, 27; Anders Anderson, 21 ; Robert Bould, 20 ; James Bryant, 19 ;William Cook, 18 ; David Braid, 14 ; Fred Marshall, 9 ; Thomas Henry Wilmehurst, 5. The first five gentlemen were declared to be duly elected.

Evening Post, Volume XXXI, Issue 46, 25 February 1886, page 2 

1891 Elections Johnsonville Licencing District Committee 

LICENSING ELECTIONS.
JOHNSONVILLE DISTRICT. The following are the nominations for the Johnsonville District:— Matthew Atkinson, nominated by G. Waddington and D. Braid; David Braid, nominated by M. Atkinson and G. Waddington; Thomas Bowler, nominated by M. Atkinson and W. H. Blunders; K. G. M. Corlet, nominated by W. H. Saunders and T. A. Bowler ; John Grierson, nominated by Thomas Bowler and T. A. Bowler; William Warcup, nominated by James Bell and T. A. Bowler. The election takes place on Tuesday, the 21st, the polling booth being at the Town Board Office.

Evening Post, Volume XLI, Issue 88, 15 April 1891 Page 3

1891 David Braid, Jury foreman at Coroner's inquest

THE JOHNSONVILLE SUICIDE.
Mr H. W. Robinson, R.M. (District Coroner), held an inquest yesterday at the Railway Hotel, Johnsonville, into the circumstances attending the death of Robert Burgess. The following jury were sworn :—David Braid (foreman), J. W. Chapman, Thomas Morgan, Anders Andersen, Thomas Bowler, and George Waddington.

New Zealand Times, Volume LII, Issue 9381, 25 August 1891

1892 Election of Commissioners Johnsonville Town Board

JOHNSONVILLE TOWN DISTRICT. GENERAL ELECTION OF COMMISSIONERS.
Notice is hereby given that an Election will be held on the 17th day of September, 1892, for the purpose of electing five (5) Commissioners for the Town District of Johnsonville. Nominations, addressed to me, will be received up to 12 o'clock noon on Monday, the 12th instant, at the Town Board Office, Johnsonville. Nomination papers can be obtained at the Post Office, or at Mr. David Braid's Store, Johnsonville.
George Wilson, Returning Officer. Town Board Office, Johnsonville, 3rd September, 1892.

Evening Post, Volume XLIV, Issue 56, 3 September 1892 Page 3

1893 Lady Electors

JOHNSONVILLE.
The Lady Electors are invited to Meet Mrs. Wilford at the Rechabite Hall. Johnsonville, on Tuesday, 31st inst., at 4 o'clock. David Braid, Convener.

Evening Post, Volume XLVI,Issue 104, 30 October 1893
Page 3 Advertisements Column 2

1896 Bankruptcy

IN BANKRUPTCY.
Notice is hereby given that the following dividend is now payable at my office on all proved and admitted claims in the undermentioned estate, viz ; David Braid, first and final dividend, 6s 8d in £.
James Ashcroft, Official Assignee. Wellington, 8th June, 1896.

New Zealand Times, Volume LVIII, Issue 2841, 9 June 1896
Page 3 Advertisements Column 4

 

LEGAL NOTICES. IN BANKRUPTCY.
I the Undersigned, hereby give notice that I intend to apply at the sitting of the Court in Bankruptcy, on the 29th day of June, 1896, for an immediate order of Discharge.
David Braid.
Johnsonville, 13th June, 1896.

New Zealand Times, Volume LVIII, Issue 2845, 13 June 1896
Page 3 Advertisements Column 2 

 

BANKRUPTCY COURT
On the application of Mr Devine, David Braid, storekeeper, in whose estate a composition of 6s 8d in the pound was paid, and on the application of Sir Robert Stout, James Dickson, baker, who paid a composition of 5s 9d in the pound, wore granted unconditional discharges.

New Zealand Times, Volume LVIX, Issue 2861, 2 July 1896 Page 4

 

BANKRUPTCY COURT
On the application of Mr Devine, David Braid, storekeeper, in whose estate a composition of 6s 8d in the pound was paid, and on the application of Sir Robert Stout, James Dickson, baker, who paid a composition of 5s 9d in the pound, were granted unconditional discharges.

New Zealand Times, Volume LVIX, Issue 2861, 2 July 1896 Page 4

1897 Bankruptcy

LOCAL AND GENERAL.
Henry George, carpenter, of Wilson Street, Newtown, and David Braid, baker, of Johnsonville, were to-day adjudged bankrupt.

Evening Post, Volume LIII, Issue 23, 28 January 1897 Page 4

 

IN BANKRUPTCY
In the Supreme Court, holden at Wellington.
"Notice is hereby given that David Braid, of Johnsonville, Baker and Storekeeper, was this day adjudged bankrupt; and I hereby summon a meeting of creditors, to be holden at my office on Monday, 1st day of February, 1897, at 2.30 o'clock. James Ashcroft, Official Assignee. Wellington, 28th January, 1897.

Evening Post, Volume LIII, Issue 23, 28 January 1897 Page 6

 

IN BANKRUPTCY. Estate of David Braid, Baker and Storekeeper, Johnsonville. Tenders are invited up to Noon of Monday, Ist February, for the Purchase of the Equity of Redemption and Goodwill of the Business carried on by the above-named Bankrupt, together with the Stock-in- Trade, Plant, Horses and Carts, &c., as per conditions and schedule to be seen at my office. The highest or any tender not necessarily accepted. James Ashcroft, Official Assignee. Wellington, 28th January, 1897.

Evening Post, Volume LIII, Issue 23, 28 January 1897 Page 6

1897 Bankruptcy outcomes

TOWN AND COUNTRY.
The liabilities in the estate of David Braid, storekeeper, of Johnsonville, are set down at £335 16s 8d, and the assets at -£171 11s 5d. The principal creditors are Finn, Chisholm and Co, ,£88 12s 9d ; Turnbull and Co., £62; E. H. Crease and Son, £56 11s 1d; J. and T. Meek (Oamaru), £60 6s; A. Bowman (Johnsonville, £18 7s; National Fire Insurance Company, £16 8s 10d; Bank of New Zealand, .£16 1s 10d. The secured creditors are Mrs Johanna Corrigan and Robert Butler, who, for respective debts of and £204 and £178 10s, hold security valued at -£100. The creditors meet at 11 a.m. today.

New Zealand Times, Volume LVX, Issue 3042, 1 February 1897 Page 2

 

A MEETING OF CREDITORS.
A meeting of creditors in the estate of David Braid, storekeeper and baker, Johnsonville, was held in the Official Assignee’s office yesterday afternoon. The bankrupt, it appeared, had also filed his schedule in February, 1896. Mr J. J. Devine appeared for the bankrupt.

The Official Assignee said that there was something to be obtained for the creditors out of the wreck. There was stock valued at £43, which was, however, only really worth about £20, and about £133 worth of good debts, and £295 worth that were absolutely had. A tender was received of £165 for the new book debts and the plant of the bakehouse, &c. The Official Assignee thought that the tender should be accepted. The total amount of debt they could hope to collect would hardly amount to £200, and it would cost the creditors 10 per cent, to collect the money. The only question whether the mortgagee, holding a mortgage over the premises, would accept the terms of the tender, the offer being to rent the premises for five years at £65 a year.

After considerable discussion, it was agreed to accept the tender, and the tenderer agreed to make arrangements with the mortgagee for the premises.

The bankrupt stated that he attributed his second bankruptcy to having been unable to make a good start since his last bankruptcy, as his credit was very much shaken by it.

The Official Assignee said it was a very sad history, but his own impression was that the bankrupt had been selling the bread at less than it cost him. His total deficiency had thus run up to £214.

The creditors expressed the opinion that the bankrupt had spent his money much too freely, and had been responsible to a very great degree for the state of his affairs.

On the motion of Mr Grey (representing Turnbull and Co.) a resolution was passed “that on account of the facts shown by two successive bankruptcies the Assignee should make representations to the Judge that the bankrupt is not competent to carry on business.”

The meeting then adjourned sine die.

New Zealand Times, Volume LVX, Issue 3043, 2 February 1897 Page 4

 

IN BANKRUPTCY.
Estate of David Braid, Johnsonville. Tenders are invited for the purchase of part Section No. 25, Porirua District, situated on Porirua road, and within 1 ½ miles of Johnsonville township, containing 2 acres (more or less), with small shed erected thereon. Also, In Estate of John Shout. For the purchase of Two Shares in No. 2 Co-operative Building Society of Wellington..

Further particulars at my office. Tenders close at Noon on Monday, 17th instant.
James Ashcroft, Official Assignee. Wellington, 11th May, 1897 

Evening Post, Volume LIII, Issue 110, 11 May 1897 Page 6

 

LOCAL AND GENERAL.
The Official Assignee has accepted the tender of G. R. McDonald for a section of land at Johnsonville in the bankrupt estate of David Braid.

New Zealand Times, Volume LVX, Issue 3131, 18 May 1897 Page 2

 

IN BANKRUPTCY.
Tender for Book Debts. Tenders are invited for the purchase of the remainder of the Book Debts in the undermentioned Bankrupt Estates, to be lodged at my office, Supreme Court Buildings, not later than noon on Saturday, the 31st of July, 1897, as per list: -
David Braid, Storekeeper, Johnsonville, £138 13s 3d
E. Lovegrove, Milkman, £18 9s
P. N. Cameron, Wood and Coal Merchant, £18 9s
A. Reid, Baker, £34 7s 8d
The list and condition of tenders can be seen on applying at my office. The highest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
James Ashcroft, Official Assignee. Wellington, 26th July, 1897.

Evening Post, Volume LIV, Issue 22, 26 July 1897 Page 8

 

NOTICE is hereby given that I intend to apply for an immediate order of Discharge at the sitting of the Court in Bankruptcy to be held on Monday, 23rd day of August, 1897.
David Braid.

New Zealand Times, Volume LXVI, Issue 3192, 29 July 1897 Page 3

 

BANKRUPTCY COURT.
David Braid, baker. — Mr. Wilford appeared for bankrupt, and stated that his client had recently suffered a severe affliction, by which he was almost blind, and was now dependent upon his children for support. All the creditors were willing to agree to his discharge. The Official Assignee pointed out that bankrupt had been twice through the Court within 12 months. The application was adjourned sine die as an alternative to refusing the discharge.

Evening Post, Volume LIV, Issue 46, 23 August 1897 Page 5

 

BANKRUPTCY COURT.
(Before His Honor Mr Justice Edwards.)
APPLICATIONS FOR DISCHARGE.
David Braid, baker, was represented by Mr Wilford, who said the bankrupt was almost blind and could not work. The Assignee said the man had carried on a reputable business for many years. His family were highly respectable, but, unfortunately, he had given way to drink. He was not fit to carry on business. The application was refused.

New Zealand Mail, Issue 1330, 26 August 1897 Page 28

1906 Death of David Braid 

FUNERAL NOTICE.
The Funeral of the late David Braid will leave the residence of his daughter, 2 Ellice Avenue, on Monday, at 1.30 o'clock, for Karori Cemetery.

Evening Post, Volume LXXI, Issue 142, 16 June 1906 Page 6

1931 Death of Rosanna Braid 

BRAID.—On 8th October, 1931, at her daughter's residence, 117 Owen street, Rosanna, beloved mother of Mrs. McFarlane, Mrs. Parnell, Mrs. Overton, Mrs. Fry, Mr. O. T. Braid, and Mr. F. D. Braid, and relict of the late David Braid, late of Johnsonville; In her 80th year.

Evening Post, Volume CXII, Issue 87, 9 October 1931 Page 1.